NASSP

When Tragedy Strikes: Tips for Coping with Student Deaths

Guest post by Paula Callan

It’s the crisis response plan we as school administrators pray we never have to implement: The sudden loss of a student. But when tragedy strikes, it’s up to school administrators to provide leadership to the entire school community and implement protocols to support the immediate family, students, and staff most affected.  (more…)

Safe Schools: Are You Ready?

Guest post by Jeff Simon

Many are concerned about the growing reports of school safety incidents. According to the Educator’s School Safety Network, U.S. schools experienced 745 bomb threats in the 2015–16 academic year. And since 2013, there have been 210 school shootings, as reported by the Everytown for Gun Safety Support Fund. This escalation of school threats and violence is generating fear and anxiety in students, parents, and educators and wasting precious learning time.

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Graduation: How Do We Get Students There?

Guest post by Ginni McDonald

Graduation is something every student should have the opportunity to experience. Aside from the indisputable benefits of a high school diploma, the preparations for graduation—the career action plans, the individualized academic plans, and the conferences—assist students in making choices that are right for them and their future. How do we connect with students to ensure they are on the road to graduation? There is no single answer to this question simply because each student is unique. (more…)

Why I’ll be Returning to the NASSP Advocacy Conference

By now, you’ve likely seen NASSP’s calls to attend the 2017 Advocacy Conference on Capitol Hill and formed a few questions about it. Will I really be meeting with members of Congress? If so, do these people really care what I have to say? What can I expect—or will be expected of me—if I go?

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Using Restorative Circles to Build Accountability and Empathy

Guest post by Heberto Hinojosa, Jr.

In Texas and many other states across the country, school districts are abandoning or limiting the use of traditional exclusionary discipline practices such as detention, in-school suspension, and suspension to tackle student behavior issues that affect the learning process. Instead, many campuses are turning to restorative discipline to help teachers and administrators prevent and respond to behavior problems. (more…)

See Your School Through the Eyes of a Student

To discover new ways to make our schools ever better places to learn, we have to understand the school experience—but as the students see it, not as we believe it to be.

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Changing Grading and Reporting Practices to Enhance Student Learning

Guest post by Tom Dodd

Three years ago, our teachers began changing the way they assess student progress at Lesher Middle School in Fort Collins, CO. Standard/criterion/competency-based grading and reporting, as it’s commonly known, allows teachers to authentically evaluate student learning progress based on state academic standards, the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), or in our case, the International Baccalaureate Middle Years Program (IBMYP) Aims and Objectives to better communicate levels of academic performance and work habits. (more…)

A Letter to Oppose the Confirmation of Betsy DeVos for Secretary of Education

NASSP has signed The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights’ letter below in opposition to Betsy DeVos becoming the secretary of education. Click here to view the official letter and the supporting organizations.

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The Model Classroom: A Makerspace for Teachers

Guest post by John Carder

By now, most educators have heard the term “makerspace.” The idea of a makerspace originated outside of the school setting as a place for community members to design and create manufactured work that wouldn’t be possible to create without the space. School makerspaces give students a place to work individually and collaboratively through hands-on creative projects that encourage them to design, experiment, repurpose, and innovate.  (more…)

NASSP Opposes Betsy DeVos’ Nomination for Secretary of Education

NASSP has decided to oppose the confirmation of Betsy DeVos as secretary of the U.S. Department of Education. While NASSP has never before taken a position on a nominee, DeVos’ lack of support for public education and inability to understand a variety of education policies has proved too worrisome to ignore. The Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee is planning to vote on DeVos’ confirmation on January 31. Click here to view the official letter sent to the HELP Committee.

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