Zachary Scott

What Would President Trump’s FY 2019 Budget Request Mean for Education?

On February 12, President Trump released his FY 2019 budget request. While the president’s budget is most likely not going to be enacted by Congress, it is still an important document that allows him to highlight the administration’s spending priorities moving forward. Unfortunately, President Trump’s budget called for drastic reductions in nondefense discretionary programs despite Congress recently passing a deal to raise the budget caps. Trump called for the Department of Education (ED) to receive $63.2 billion in FY 2019. This is a $3.6 billion—or 5.4 percent—cut from the amount ED received in FY 2017.

What follows is an analysis of how some of NASSP’s top priorities faired in Trump’s budget request. (more…)

Impacts the New Caps Deal Will Have on Education

For the second time in less than three weeks, the government shut down. At midnight on February 8, funding for the government officially lapsed after Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) refused to allow the Senate to hold a vote on another short-term funding package. Fortunately, none of the detrimental long-term impacts of a shutdown were felt, as Congress was able to pass the bill just hours later in the early morning of February 9. This new funding package carries with it greater hope to avoid more budget politics in the future though, as tied to it is a deal to raise the defense and nondefense discretionary spending caps for the next two years. Now that the Appropriations Committees have concrete numbers, they’re able to begin writing the rest of the FY 2018 budget. They have over a month to do so, as the current short-term funding package will expire on March 23. But how will this caps deal influence education, and what does it mean for the remaining FY 2018 budget process? (more…)

Advocacy Update: Government Shutdown

After months and months of short-term funding packages, time finally ran out. The Senate was unable to pass a continuing resolution before January 20 and because of this, the federal government has shut down for the first time since 2013.

Much of the impact K–12 education will face will depend on the length of the shutdown. Most education programs are forward funded, meaning dollars are already designated to go out to programs, regardless of a shutdown. However, the longer the shutdown, the greater the impact that will be felt by schools and districts. Overall, we can break down a shutdown’s impact into three main areas for K–12 education: (more…)

Advocacy Update: Analysis of Tax Reform and Its Impact on Education

After months of debate, conferencing, and closed-door deals, Republicans in Congress passed a sweeping tax reform bill—H.R. 1, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act—that was signed into law by President Trump on December 22, 2017.

While the bill has implications that will undoubtedly affect all Americans, there are several components that may directly affect schools, educators, and students: (more…)

Advocacy Update

Inside the Beltway

What’s Happening in Washington?

Congress narrowly avoided a government shutdown last week by passing a continuing resolution through January 19, 2018. Congress also passed a sweeping tax overhaul that was signed into law by President Trump.

Why Should Principals Care?

Congress avoided a government shutdown in December by passing a continuing resolution (CR) that provides level funding for the government through January 19. (more…)

Advocacy Update

Don’t Miss the 2018 Advocacy Conference in Washington, D.C.!

Join principals from across the nation in Washington, D.C., March 19–21, for the 2018 NASSP Advocacy Conference. At this conference, you will have the opportunity to hear from some of the nation’s foremost education thought leaders. You will also take part in federal advocacy training and will use that training on Capitol Hill in meetings with your elected representatives in Congress.

Registration is available to Federal Grassroots Network (FGN) members and is free, but attendees will be responsible for their hotel and travel costs. (more…)

Advocacy Update

Don’t Miss the 2018 Advocacy Conference in Washington, D.C.!

Join principals from across the nation in Washington, D.C., March 19–21, for the 2018 NASSP Advocacy Conference. At this conference, you will have the opportunity to hear from some of the nation’s foremost education thought leaders. You will also receive federal advocacy training and the chance to use that training on Capitol Hill in meetings with your congressional representatives. (more…)

Advocacy Update

Register Today for the 2018 Advocacy Conference

Join principals from across the nation in Washington, D.C., March 19–21, for the 2018 NASSP Advocacy Conference. At this conference, you will have the opportunity to hear from some of the nation’s foremost education thought leaders. You will also receive federal advocacy training and the chance to use that training on Capitol Hill in meetings with your elected representatives in Congress.

Only Federal Grassroots Network (FGN) members may register. Registration for the conference is free, but attendees will be responsible for their hotel and travel costs. (more…)

Advocacy Update

Register Today for the 2018 Advocacy Conference

The 2018 NASSP Advocacy Conference will bring together principals from across the nation to advocate on behalf of their students, schools, and profession. By joining us on March 19–21, you will have the opportunity to hear from some of the nation’s foremost education thought leaders. You will also receive federal advocacy training and the chance to use that training on visits with your elected representatives in Congress on Capitol Hill.

(more…)

Advocacy Update

Registration is Open for the 2018 Advocacy Conference

As a principal, you have a unique perspective on the issues facing your profession, your school, and your students. Join us March 19–21 at the NASSP 2018 Advocacy Conference to gain the knowledge and training you need to share this perspective and use your voice to become a strong advocate for education. You will also get the opportunity to use these skills in meetings with congressional representatives and their staff on Capitol Hill. (more…)