Advocacy

The FY 2019 Appropriations Process Continues to Move Along

Earlier this year, congressional leaders in both the House and Senate stated their intent to pass all 12 appropriations bills, a process often referred to as “regular order,” which hasn’t been done since 1996 as to avoid another end of the year budget package. In late June, House and Senate Appropriations subcommittees on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies (Labor-HHS-Ed) both released their spending bills. The Senate acted on their bill and packaged it with the defense spending bill to help pass the two largest spending bills at once. (more…)

NASSP and HRC Lead School Inclusion Efforts for LGBTQ Students

NASSP and the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) have partnered to highlight the important role that principals have in striving for educational equity, with a focus on safety and inclusion for LGBTQ students.

The need for culturally responsive practices that promote each student’s academic well-being is especially critical in this politically charged time. HRC’s 2018 LGBTQ Youth Report found that only 26 percent of LGBTQ students feel safe in their classrooms, with only 5 percent stating that they feel their teachers and school staff are supportive of LGBTQ people. This heartfelt video clip spotlights just some of these experiences faced by LGBTQ students. At the same time, according to the Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Education Network (GLSEN), 83 percent of educators felt they should provide safe classrooms for LGBTQ students, though only half have actually taken action to do so. (more…)

Bartoletti NPC18 Speech Recommits NASSP to Equity; Admonishes DeVos to Do the Same

In a powerful opening speech at the 2018 NASSP National Principals Conference in July, Executive Director JoAnn Bartoletti once again reinforced NASSP’s commitment to equity and support of public education with a strong statement directed at U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos. (more…)

How Are NASSP’s Priorities Faring During the Appropriations Process?

Earlier this year, congressional leaders in both the House and Senate stated their intent to pass all 12 appropriations bills to avoid another end-of-year budget package—a process often referred to as “regular order,” which hasn’t been done since 1996. In late June, House and Senate Appropriations  subcommittees on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies (Labor-HHS-Ed) both released their spending bills. Below is a quick breakdown of how these bills address some of NASSP’s top priorities, and an update on what their current status is: (more…)

7 Strategies to Enhance School Safety

Guest post by Bill Ziegler

Without a doubt, the most pressing issue in schools today is safety. It seems like a week can’t go by without hearing about a school shooting or someone talking about school safety fears. The Washington Post recently reported a startling statistic that indicated more students have died in school shootings in 2018 than U.S. military members killed during deployment this year. Hardly a day goes by in school when I’m not thinking, “What would I do if shots went off here?” How can principals take action to protect our school community? Here are seven strategies to help keep your school safer.  (more…)

A Voucher Bill That Harms Military Families

NASSP has long been an opponent of private school vouchers and an active member of the National Coalition on Public Education (NCPE). Private school voucher policies drain necessary funds from our nation’s public school system, are not required to follow many federal nondiscrimination statutes, and have no concrete proof that they serve students better than their public counterparts.

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School Safety Advocacy From a Student’s Perspective

Following the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, FL, which claimed the lives of 17 students and educators, advocates around the country organized a national movement demanding change to better protect our schools and communities from gun violence. Leading that movement are student survivors of the shooting joined by thousands of young people across the country.

The NASSP Student Leadership Advisory Committee joined those efforts, organizing advocacy events and actions to honor the lives of the Stoneman Douglas victims and to call for policy change. Here are testimonials about that advocacy from one of the students on the committee and one of the committee’s adult advisers: (more…)

Every Student Matters

Guest post by John C. Bartlett

When I woke up the morning after Election Day, my to-do list had a new priority: a visit to my English language learner classroom and a conversation with our 50 students who were getting their first taste of American democracy at work. What did these students want and need from me and their teachers? These students wanted to know that they matter, that someone cared about them, and that they were safe. Essentially, they wanted to know what every student needs to know when they walk through the front door of our schools every day. (more…)

Leveraging Title IV, Part A to Create Safe and Supportive Schools

Guest post by Kelly Vaillancourt Strobach

Principals have a responsibility to ensure student safety while also providing a supportive environment that is conducive to learning. This requires a careful balance of addressing physical safety while also addressing the psychological safety of students. Despite the current focus on arming teachers and other school personnel, this tactic does not improve school safety, carries significant risk, and can actually undermine the learning environment. Rather, reasonable physical security measures include: (more…)

Safe Schools: Are You Ready?

Guest post by Jeff Simon

Many are concerned about the growing reports of school safety incidents. According to the Educator’s School Safety Network, U.S. schools experienced 745 bomb threats in the 2015–16 academic year. And since 2013, there have been 210 school shootings, as reported by the Everytown for Gun Safety Support Fund. This escalation of school threats and violence is generating fear and anxiety in students, parents, and educators and wasting precious learning time.

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