National Honor Society

Creating a Better Culture: Why I Became an Adviser

Our chapter had tremendous potential, and it was time to realize it

My school opened in the 1960s, and it has always had a National Honor Society (NHS) chapter. At first it was great, but over the years it began to decline; it was a disorganized group and the bylaws weren’t strong enough. I became the new adviser because I wanted to turn it back into what it should be. Now, the students truly see the value in the leadership opportunities they get by participating. Incoming freshmen are even beginning to ask how they can get into NHS, and that hasn’t always been a question on their minds. (more…)

Out of the School and Into the Community: Why I Became an Adviser

Guest post by Natasha Schaefer, NHS adviser at Woodcreek High School in Roseville, CA. 

When I opened my inbox to find an email from my vice principal, I was relieved that it wasn’t about an upset parent or other administrative tasks. Instead, it was calling for volunteers. Our National Honor Society (NHS) adviser had moved to another school, and the position needed to be filled. While I normally worked with lower-achieving students—a satisfying duty in its own right—I decided I wanted to get to know the kids on the other end of the spectrum. (more…)

Global Change Through Local Action: Why I Became an Adviser

My students fell in love with serving their local community and it made them part of something much bigger.

When the National Honor Society (NHS) adviser at my school retired after 15 years, she turned to me with the request that I lead her NHS students. She admitted it would take a ton of time and even more energy, but that it would be the most rewarding job of my life.

She was right. (more…)

Carrying on the Tradition: Why I Became an Adviser

I knew the importance of NHS from my days as a student, and participating as an adviser is even more rewarding.

When I first came to my high school, I was asked to be a National Honor Society (NHS) adviser. I jumped at the chance, as I remembered being an NHS member myself and how it connected me to the community. I knew I wanted to make an impact with our chapter and put us on the map in our school—many of the students didn’t know what NHS was, let alone want to join. Now, 12 years later, we’re ingrained in our school’s culture, and younger students aspire to become members. (more…)

In Times of Crisis: Why I Became an Adviser

No one could have foreseen our frightening circumstances, but having an NHS chapter made all the difference.

I have been a National Honor Society (NHS) adviser for three years. Actually, it’s more accurate to say that I have been the sole adviser for that long—I had previously been co-advising our chapter with my wife for some time after the former advisers stepped down. In that time, we have grown to a 160-member group out of 2,100 students; we are one of the largest high schools in our semi-rural area. When disaster struck on April 20, 2018, we needed the support of all 160 members. (more…)

The Art of Giving (and Receiving): Why I Became an Adviser

Through NHS, my students learned that the more you give to the world, the more you get back.

By teaching upper level students, I’m able to get to know them inside the classroom. When the chance came for me to work with them outside the classroom as a National Honor Society (NHS) adviser, it was a no-brainer. (more…)

G.R.O.W. Into Leadership

Guest post by Omékongo Dibinga

“Leadership ain’t for the lame, don’t take it in vain
Time to rethink your position, understand why you came.”

I often recite these two lines from a poem I wrote on leadership when I speak to student leaders around the world. I share this quote to underscore two points: First, leadership is not for everyone. Though everyone can be a leader, leadership is a calling that few people answer and, therefore, it must be carefully considered. Second, leaders must always be thinking about why they chose to be a leader, and whether they still have the capacity or even the desire to lead.

(more…)

Money Matters: 5 Tips for Tackling Scholarship Application Essays

Guest post by Andrea Elzy

Andrea “Drea” Elzy recently led a National Honor Society virtual college application essay writing workshop on the topic of scholarship applications. Here, she offers valuable tips that can be shared with students.

The college admission process can be a rigorous one—and requires reflection on what schools to apply to, why to apply to those particular universities, and how students might potentially finance their education.

Scholarships can be a great resource and an often untapped way to help ease the burden of educational expenses. There is no shortage of funding through scholarships—and, in many cases, students may find that there are scholarships available for not only academics and extracurricular involvement, but also scholarships available for personal attributes, qualities, etc.

Here are five tips (more…)

Reflections: Who Made You Proud Today?

Put aside the standardized test scores, budget spreadsheets, and graduation rate analysis for your school for just a moment—and join me in some time for reflection.

Think about the students who made a difference in your school or community in a truly significant way. After all, these are the moments that remind us of our impact as educational leaders.

As this year’s record number of applicants for the National Honor Society (NHS) Scholarship clearly proves, there is an abundance of students (more…)

Higher Ambitions Toward Higher Education: NHS and NJHS Lead the Way

This academic year, the National Honor Society (NHS) and the National Junior Honor Society (NJHS) embarked on an aggressive goal: To support and increase college access and success for its members—and secondary students in general. The goal targets a White House initiative rooted in a profound statistic.

In a June 2014 Education Week article, First Lady Michelle Obama, an NHS alumna herself, wrote, “A generation ago, America had the highest percentage of college graduates in the world. But today, we’ve dropped all the way to 12th in terms of young adults.” (more…)