Technology

3 Tips to Increase Your Productivity

Guest post by Daisy Dyer Duerr

Principals and assistant principals can struggle with a variety of distractions that curb their productivity each and every day. As the new school year gets underway, do you find yourself asking whether you are being as productive as you want to be?

As a school leader, I found I was able to amp up my productivity and I’d like to share with you a few tips and tricks:

  • Email. I spent 30 minutes on email before students arrived at school, then one hour after my children were in bed at night. NO MORE. You can’t build relationships over email, but you can sure ruin them if you aren’t setting aside the appropriate time to focus on your email communication.

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Senate Passes ESEA Reauthorization Bill, Sets Stage for Conference Committee

Less than two weeks after the U.S. House of Representatives moved to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) by passing the Student Success Act (H.R. 5), the Senate followed suit by passing the Every Child Achieves Act (S. 1177) by a vote of 81 to 17.

This historic achievement comes seven years after No Child Left Behind (NCLB) was due for reauthorization. The bill was opposed by 14 Republicans who felt the bill did not go far enough to restore local control in education and three Democrats because of concerns over missing civil rights provisions.

The Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee Chairman Lamar Alexander (R-TN) issued the following statement after the bill passed the Senate:

“Last week, Newsweek Magazine called this the ‘law that everyone wants to fix’—and today the Senate’s shown that not only is there broad consensus on the need to fix this law—remarkably, there’s also broad consensus on how to fix it.”

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Principals and Online Testing – Part II

Note: This is the second of a two-part post on the challenges faced by principals implementing online testing tied to the Common Core and new college- and career-ready standards. So much has happened in recent weeks that I divided the entry into two parts because one post would not do justice to the topic.

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In part 1, I described that with the spring testing season now winding down, principals in a number of states feel as though they are under siege. For some schools, whatever could go wrong has gone wrong.

From my contact with principals in a number of states and my ongoing work with principals in schools in five states, I have learned that online assessments present principals with a number of new and old challenges.

I divided this post into two parts. Part 1 addressed no-technical challenges principals face in implementing the new assessments. This entry will address the technical issues.

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Principals and Online Testing – Part I

Note: I intended that this blog entry would focus only on the technical side of online testing, but so much has happened in recent weeks that I would not do justice to the topic if I ignored the context in which the new, online testing occurs.

WiGetItRight.jpgth the spring testing season now winding down, principals in a number of states feel as though they are under siege. For some schools, whatever could go wrong has gone wrong.

From my contact with principals in a number of states and my ongoing work with principals in schools in five states, I have learned that online assessments present principals with a number of new and old challenges.

I have divided this post into two parts. Part 1 will address no-technical challenges principals face in implementing the new assessments. Part 2 will address the technical issues.

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New Data Privacy Bills Could Threaten Innovation in Schools

As we reported in a blog post earlier this month, student data privacy continues to be a hot topic on Capitol Hill with a whopping five legislative proposals in circulation. While earlier bills focused on education technology companies and their use of student data, the new proposals would reauthorize the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and have a great impact on principals and how they run their schools.

House Education and the Workforce Committee Chairman John Kline (R-MN) and Ranking Member Bobby Scott (D-VA) released a discussion draft to totally rewrite FERPA in early April. The draft would grant parents the right to inspect and review their children’s education records and require educators to grant requests within 30 days. Educational agencies would be prohibited from releasing education records or personally identifiable information (PII) of students without written consent of their parents with few exceptions. Unidentifiable student data could be released for the purpose of education research, but the draft proposes a requirement that parents be notified of the studies and be given a reasonable amount of time to opt out. (more…)

Student Data Privacy Is the Newest Hot Topic on the Hill

As the use of digital technology rises in schools, so does the concern about the security of student data. Numerous state bills have been introduced and passed in the past few years, but now Congress is starting to examine a federal response and NASSP has been at the table for these discussions. Our objective is aligned to the position statement approved by the Board of Directors in February 2015: to ensure the protection of student privacy and appropriate use of student data to improve teaching and learning in the classroom. (more…)

Senate Education Committee Unanimously Approves Bipartisan ESEA Bill

After two days of debate and consideration of nearly 90 amendments, the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee approved its bill to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) in a historic, 22-0, vote on April 16. The Every Child Achieves Act was the end result of weeks of bipartisan negotiations between Chairman Lamar Alexander (R-TN) and Ranking Member Patty Murray (D-WA), and their leadership was evident throughout the cordial committee debate.

NASSP was pleased that the first amendment approved by committee would authorize a competitive grant for states and districts to audit their assessment systems, including the number of tests and the time spent on test-taking, in order to reduce redundant or unnecessary state and district assessments. The amendment was based on the SMART Act (S. 907) and introduced by Sen. Tammy Baldwin (D-WI) who also sponsored the bill. (more…)

House Hearing Addresses Student Data Privacy Issues

Following up on a speech given by President Obama in January, the House Education and the Workforce Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary and Secondary Education held a hearing on February 12 to explore the use of new technology in the classroom and examine the need to modernize the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).

Pointing out that FERPA has not been “significantly updated” since its introduction in 1974, Subcommittee Chairman Todd Rokita (R-IN) said that recent efforts to address student privacy issues have not addressed the rules under which schools must operate as the “guardians” of student data. Ranking Member Marcia Fudge (D-OH) said that Congress must ensure that student data is only used for defined educational purposes. She also pointed out that teachers and school leaders need to know how to properly protect student data. (more…)

President Obama Calls for New Initiatives to Safeguard Student Data

Providing a sneak preview of priorities that will be highlighted in his State of the Union address, President Barack Obama gave a speech at the Federal Trade Commission on January 12 where he outlined initiatives to protect consumers from identity theft and ensure that student data is used only for educational purposes.

President Obama urged Congress to act on student data privacy in 2015 and will soon release a legislative proposal titled the Student Digital Privacy Act. The bill would be modeled on legislation approved in California last year that prohibits education technology companies from selling student data to third parties for purposes unrelated to the educational mission and targeted advertising to students.

President Obama also noted that the Privacy Technical Assurance Center at the U.S. Department of Education will develop model terms of service and teacher training assistance that will “enhance our ability to help ensure educational data is used appropriately and in accordance with the educational mission.” (more…)

NASSP Digital Principal Advocates for Rural Schools at FCC Meeting

St. Paul, Arkansas principal Daisy Dyer Duerr was invited to speak before the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) on behalf of rural schools prior to their successful 3-2 vote to increase funding for the E-Rate program. The vote will ensure that an additional 408,000 in her state will have access to high-speed broadband Internet and Wi-Fi access in their classrooms.

Duerr, who was named an NASSP Digital Principal earlier this year, shared the story of her school’s success in using technology to greatly improve student achievement. When she became the principal of the 225-student K-12 campus in 2011, the high school was being targeted by the state for poor test scores in literacy and math, and the elementary grades had just been removed from Arkansas’ school improvement roles. (more…)