Common Core

Advocacy Update: Tracking ESSA

NASSP Board of Directors Considers Statement on Transgender Students

The NASSP Board of Directors has stated its intent to adopt a position statement on transgender students. It will be open for a public comment period until Friday, June 10, and the Board will give final approval at its next meeting in July. Please send feedback to NASSP Director of Advocacy Amanda Karhuse at karhusea@nassp.org.

In the position statement, NASSP called on the U.S. Department of Education (ED) to issue guidance to schools on transgender students. (more…)

Advocacy Update

Implementing ESSA Updates

NASSP has joined with other national education organizations to form the State and Local ESSA Implementation Network, which recently sent a letter to Acting Secretary of Education John King urging a timely, fair transition to ESSA and a collaborative process that brings all parties to the table.

Inside the Beltway

What’s going on in Washington? (more…)

Advocacy Update

Take Action on ESEA

Congress may be on recess, but NASSP is working hard to ensure principals have a voice in ESEA reauthorization. Working with the National Association of Elementary School Principals and the American Federation of School Administrators, NASSP sent a detailed letter to lawmakers on Capitol Hill outlining our concerns and priorities going forward with the ESEA conference report. Make a difference today and tell your members of Congress to do what’s right for school leaders and students!

National Principals Month Resolutions

Resolutions celebrating National Principals Month recently passed in the House and Senate. Thanks to Rep. Susan Davis (D-CA) and Sen. Al Franken (D-MN) for sponsoring their respective resolution. (more…)

Senate Passes ESEA Reauthorization Bill, Sets Stage for Conference Committee

Less than two weeks after the U.S. House of Representatives moved to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) by passing the Student Success Act (H.R. 5), the Senate followed suit by passing the Every Child Achieves Act (S. 1177) by a vote of 81 to 17.

This historic achievement comes seven years after No Child Left Behind (NCLB) was due for reauthorization. The bill was opposed by 14 Republicans who felt the bill did not go far enough to restore local control in education and three Democrats because of concerns over missing civil rights provisions.

The Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee Chairman Lamar Alexander (R-TN) issued the following statement after the bill passed the Senate:

“Last week, Newsweek Magazine called this the ‘law that everyone wants to fix’—and today the Senate’s shown that not only is there broad consensus on the need to fix this law—remarkably, there’s also broad consensus on how to fix it.”

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In Case You Missed It—Summer PD Opportunities

Forget the summer reading list. Start making your summer “watch” list. The NASSP archives offer some insightful webinars for your professional development. Take advantage of the typically less stressful days of summer and consider these five webinars on pressing education topics.

Testing
Fresh on the heels of state-mandated testing of your students’ proficiency with state standards, you may wish to listen in on Rick Wormeli’s “Standards-Based Assessment and Grading.” An interactive webinar from March 25, 2014, Wormeli addresses what principals need to know and communicate to teachers in the new standards-based environment.

Common Core
For those struggling with developing and implementing a schoolwide literacy initiative, “Literacy Lessons Learned,” hosted by Mel Riddile, associate director of high school services for NASSP, offers insights from four practicing school leaders. (more…)

The Opt-Out Movement Gains Steam

Since the beginning of the 2014-2015 school year, tens of thousands of students across the country have opted out of federally mandated assessments. The opt-out movement has become a way for parents and students to protest the implementation of the Common Core State Standards as well as the overabundance of testing in schools.

One of the key provisions of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law requires school districts to maintain a 95 percent assessment participation rate. U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan recently told states they risk losing federal funds if they fall below 95 percent compliance. This could have major implications for low-income and rural school districts that rely heavily on federal funding to hire staff, upgrade schools, and incorporate new programs. (more…)

Don’t Think Outside the Box—Make a New Box

Guest post by Janice Case, a consultant, certified trainer, and educator with more than 20 years’ experience in public and private school education.

For school leaders and counselors, implementing the Common Core State Standards is not about thinking outside the box. It is about transforming the box itself (NASSP, NAESP, College Summit, Achieve, 2013). Now, more than ever, we’re charged with ensuring that all students are college and career ready when they graduate from high school. So what does it take, exactly, to create a graduating class that is 100 percent college and career ready? The answer: implementing a college-going culture. (more…)