Government shutdown

Advocacy Update: NASSP Advocacy Leads to Big Increases for Programs Benefitting Principals and Students

After months of tumultuous negotiations, Republicans and Democrats finally struck a deal for the FY 2020 budget, avoiding a possible government shutdown right before Congress’ scheduled holiday break. Earlier this week, lawmakers reached an agreement and President Trump is planning on signing two different omnibus packages that contained the 12 appropriations bills that fund the federal government. Education funding was a big winner in this final package, with many of NASSP’s priority programs seeing increases for the first time in several years. Overall, the package provides a total of $72.8 billion for the Department of Education (ED), $1.3 billion above the FY 2019 enacted level. Some of NASSP’s highest-priority programs received substantial funding increases in the FY 2020 package, including: (more…)

Impacts the New Caps Deal Will Have on Education

For the second time in less than three weeks, the government shut down. At midnight on February 8, funding for the government officially lapsed after Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) refused to allow the Senate to hold a vote on another short-term funding package. Fortunately, none of the detrimental long-term impacts of a shutdown were felt, as Congress was able to pass the bill just hours later in the early morning of February 9. This new funding package carries with it greater hope to avoid more budget politics in the future though, as tied to it is a deal to raise the defense and nondefense discretionary spending caps for the next two years. Now that the Appropriations Committees have concrete numbers, they’re able to begin writing the rest of the FY 2018 budget. They have over a month to do so, as the current short-term funding package will expire on March 23. But how will this caps deal influence education, and what does it mean for the remaining FY 2018 budget process? (more…)

Advocacy Update: Government Shutdown

After months and months of short-term funding packages, time finally ran out. The Senate was unable to pass a continuing resolution before January 20 and because of this, the federal government has shut down for the first time since 2013.

Much of the impact K–12 education will face will depend on the length of the shutdown. Most education programs are forward funded, meaning dollars are already designated to go out to programs, regardless of a shutdown. However, the longer the shutdown, the greater the impact that will be felt by schools and districts. Overall, we can break down a shutdown’s impact into three main areas for K–12 education: (more…)