Social and Mobile Technology

Ready to Ignite!

Reposted from Tim Dawkins’ (@Tim_Dawks) Let Learning Lead blog

It’s well-known throughout the world of social media that since WiFi has been made available on airplanes, one of the first things many people do once they’ve been cleared to access it is to tell everyone that they are “Tweeting from an airplane” or “Facebook-chatting from an airplane” or “Taking pictures of the beautiful sunset/sunrise from 30,000 feet and sharing it with you all from an airplane” before they do anything else. (more…)

Tips on Using the Ignite ’14 Mobile App

Make sure to take advantage of all of the Ignite ’14 app features while attending the conference.

Use the schedule and presenter icons on the app home screen to explore the learning opportunities available and find out more about the schools and speakers presenting.

Take note of these app features in each specific session screen:

  • The pencil icon will allow you to take notes on that specific session. Notes taken for all sessions will be saved together under “My Notes” in the Event Extras list, which can be found by clicking the arrow on the top left of the screen while on the app homepage.
  • If you tap the “Add to Schedule” option, that session will be added to your calendar, which can be accessed by clicking “My Schedule” in the Events Extra list. Please note that there is also an option to “bookmark” a session by clicking on the bookmark icon. This will NOT add the session to your schedule, but will save all your bookmarked sessions together under the “Bookmarked Activities” tab in the schedule icon.
  • The alarm clock icon allows you to set a reminder for that specific session
  • The camera icon allows you to take a photo of the session, which can be saved to that session, allowing all other app users to see.
  • Notice the “Tap here to take a survey for this event” option. This will allow you to give your feedback on a session through 10 short questions.

The Exhibitors icon will take you to a list of the many exhibitors, their booth numbers, and a floor plan. You will be able to view contact information for the exhibitors and search exhibitors by category.

Make sure to use the Conference Blog icon to follow along with the many updates that NASSP staff members and others will be posting throughout the whole conference.

The Twitter icon will take you to a #nassp14 streaming page so you can see what all attendees are tweeting about. Make sure to join in on the conversation!

The My Connections icon is a way for you to connect with other conference attendees. When you tap on the icon, you will get prompted to add your name, contact information, title, organization, and a photo of yourself. You can add as little or as much personal information as you would like. If you want your profile to be private, meaning that another attendee would have to request to connect with you and you would have to approve that request to see any information you’ve shared, click the “set my profile to private.” Leave that unchecked if you want your profile to be public so that all attendees can see it.

In the attendee list, attendees who have set their profiles to public will have “contact requested” under their name. To request to connect with a certain attendee, whether they are private or public, tap on their name, and then the small head icon. They will have to confirm your request before you can see their information if they are private.

To make any changes to your attendee profile after the initial sign up process, tap the arrow on the top left corner when on the app home screen. That will direct you to the Event Extras side menu. From there, tap “Return to Event Directory” which is at the very top.

When in the event directory, tap the box on the top left corner with two circles. Then go into your profile settings too add information, or change the privacy settings. To go back to the app home screen, click on the Ignite 2014 box.

The planning guide icon will give you information on how to use the interactive PDF of the planning guide. The interactive planning guide only works on the web version of this app or on a Microsoft Surface tablet because of Adobe restrictions.

The search function allows you to search for any speaker or school to see what sessions they are involved with or to search for a topic such as “common core” to see all common core related sessions.

Use the QR Scanner to scan various QR codes throughout the conference.

Under the Conference Maps icon, you will find maps for the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd floors of the conference center, as well as the 2nd, 4th, and 37th floors of the hotel, where conference activities are taking place.

Use the Discover Dallas and Dallas Map icons to familiarize yourself with the city and learn more about nearby attractions.
Don’t miss the Event Extras option menu, which can be found by clicking on the left arrow at the top of the Event Guide home screen.

The Event Compass will show you a list of sessions about to begin.

My Schedule will show your calendar and any sessions you have added to it.

The Notifications tab will display any notifications NASSP has sent out, including updates about events or room changes.
My Contacts will save any people you have connected with through My Connections on the app home screen.

My Notes will display all the notes you have taken in specific sessions.

For problems using this mobile app, you can contact Crowd Compass support at 888-889-3069, option 1 or email support@crowdcompass.com.

Just the PiL You Need: Microsoft Partners in Learning Network

Guest post by Wendell B. Sumter:

In the spring of 2012, kindergarten teacher Stephanie Barber and I gave lengthy answers to questions about how our school integrated technology in the classrooms and used it to propel professional development. We then submitted our application to Microsoft to be considered a Microsoft Pathfinder School. At the time, we were very enthused about the possibility of our school being named. We knew that it was a long shot. We were a small rural school in Chester County, South Carolina and a title one school, but we didn’t allow that to deter us from applying for such a great opportunity and honor.

In October 2012, Microsoft named our school a 2012 “Innovative Pathfinder School.” The honor came from The Microsoft Partners in Learning Program, a 10-year, nearly $500 million commitment to transform K12 education around the world by connecting teachers and school leaders in a community of professional development. The program also helps school leaders foster innovative teaching practices and 21st-century learning by providing tools and resources they need to better impact student participation.

Three years ago, when I arrived at Great Falls Elementary, we had a basic computer lab. Some teachers had Promethean whiteboards, and there were two computers in each classroom. Since then, we have increased student access to technology in various ways. Technology doesn’t take the place of authentic teaching; the most important thing to me is that teachers are able to use technology to enhance student achievement.

When we were selected as a Pathfinder School by Microsoft, Mrs. Barber and I had the opportunity to attend Microsoft’s “Partners In Learning Global Forum” in Prague, where administrators convened to share their schools’ tech success stories. We also had the awesome opportunity to form partnerships with other schools and continue professional development with Microsoft’s Virtual University.

We teamed with 11 other schools, including a mentor school from New Zealand, to focus on customizing lessons and training teachers to effectively use technology tools. Through virtual meetings, we continue to brainstorm and share ideas and resources. Collaborating is a big benefit of being a Pathfinder School; I have the ability to say to my colleagues, ‘Did you try this at your school?’ and ‘How did it work?’“

So if you’re looking for a cure to your technology woes; if you’re looking for ways to improve your technology skills or those of your staff; if you’re interested in partnering with other schools across the world; if you’re looking for ways to gain recognition and bring powerful resources and tools to your campus to transform the learning environment through teaching and learning, we have just the PiL you need! Come learn about Microsoft’s Partners in Learning Program and opportunities to be an attendee at the Partners In Learning Global Forum! In this session you will learn about free resources, valuable international networking, and opportunities to become recognized as an Innovative School! Join the network and become an innovative school by visiting www.pil-network.com/schools.

Wendell B. Sumter is Principal of Great Falls Elementary School in South Carolina. Wendell joins Byron Garrett, director of the innovative schools program at Microsoft, to present Partners in Learning! Microsoft Innovative Schools Program on Saturday, February 8 at Ignite ’14 in Dallas. For more information and to register visit www.nasspconference.org.

Make the Most of Your Opportunity to Connect

Guest post by Carrie Jackson:

One of the greatest benefits connected educators and leaders enjoy is the opportunity to share with one another and have others push our own learning. Through Twitter and other media, school leaders have become more connected and reflective than ever before. However, the very best part of being a connected leader, in my opinion, is the opportunity to interact face-to-face with our online colleagues. This is one reason I eagerly anticipate NASSP’s Ignite ’14 in my beloved state of Texas.

Ignite ’14 captures the spirit of collaboration and brings it to life with personal interactions. NASSP intentionally built office hours and networking sessions into the schedule so that participants can easily find and converse with nationally-recognized authors, speakers, and practitioners. Learning labs and Technology Showcase sessions offer brief small-group discussions on topics of interest and direct application to professional practice.

Most impressive, in my opinion, is the way social media interactions on Twitter, Instagram, blogs, and more blend seamlessly with in-person learning events. Live-streaming conversations bring participants closer together and enhance connections.

So how does the Ignite ’14 participant make the most of this year’s gathering in Dallas?

Engage with Twitter…now. If you are not already a connected learner, you will be surprised just how much your interaction with others on Twitter will enhance your experience. Set up your account, and start by following @NASSP. Then take a look at who NASSP follows and mentions. Those are good people to follow. Check out what these folks are saying, and chime in when you are ready. By the time you get to Dallas, you will feel as though you know quite a few of the Ignite ’14 participants already.

Visit the networking sessions. You are missing out on something special if you pass up the speaker office hours, the Technology Showcase sessions, and the learning labs. These are great ways to extend your learning, capitalize on new strategies, and connect with new people personally.

Make time to connect with colleagues. Whether you hang out in the designated social lounge areas or hold informal Tweet-ups, capitalize on the opportunity to meet in person the colleagues you have come to know online. If you really appreciate a speaker, stop by and let him/her know during office hours. Engage with other learners and your experience (and theirs) will be better.

I look forward to seeing you at Ignite ’14, and I hope you enjoy your time in Dallas!

Carrie Jackson (@jackson_carrie) was named an NASSP Digital Principal in 2013. Carrie will be presenting Stylish New Social Tools for Schools on Saturday, February 8 at Ignite ’14. For more information and to register visit www.nasspconference.org.

A Schoolhouse for Today’s Learners

Guest post by Dwight Carter:

In most cases, one of the last places affected by school reform is the schoolhouse itself. It’s expensive to completely redesign an entire school, and we are used to school looking a certain way: long corridors, square classrooms, rows of lockers, trophy cases lining the walls of the lobby, a large bland cafeteria, narrow stairways, and little natural light.

Today’s learners–Millennials and the “iGeneration”–need a new kind of school. They are wired differently than any generation that has come before them, due in part to the integration of technology in everyday life. Millennials include those born between 1977 and 1998 or by some definitions 1982 to 2000.

According to The Learning Café and American Demographics, today’s generation of students are creative and collaborative by nature; they don’t know life without connectivity; they multitask; they want positive relationships with their teacher, administrator, or boss; they want things personalized to their interests; and they want to rewrite the rules. They see institutions as irrelevant, and schools are often seen as institutions to them. Understandably, traditional school design hinders how today’s learner want to interact and engage in school.

At Gahanna Lincoln High School, we were facing a challenge: With 2400 students, we were at capacity and had the opportunity to do something creative to provide more space and, at the same time, meet the needs of today’s learner.

With the vision of former Superintendents Gregg Morris and Mark White, along with a team of curriculum coordinators, business directors, and highly qualified teachers, we built Clark Hall. Clark Hall is a 51,000-square-foot, three-story work of art. It doesn’t resemble a typical American high school at all; rather it’s more like an innovative office building. The goal was to create an open, modern, bright space that evokes creativity, collaboration, critical thinking, choice and fun. It houses fourteen classrooms, each with its own conference room, enterprise strength connectivity, natural light, laptops for every student, and collaborative spaces in hallways so students are able to use the entire space for learning.

We traded in the traditional rows of desks and chairs for soft, brightly colored modular furniture, some exercise balls, a few rocking chairs, and a couple of Adirondack chairs. We created two large commons areas that can be used for just about anything we want: smaller classroom space or large presentation space. A few of the classrooms have colorful carpet squares that make up a soft seating area of the sort you might find in a modern coffee house or redesigned university student union. We abandoned the “bargain-basement beige” paint for splashes of primary colors and bright white. We worked with the architects to include as much natural light as possible to evoke energy and creativity.

With flexibility built into the daily schedule, teachers have more time to interact with students on an individual basis, students feel more relaxed and are more compelled to engage in the learning process, and collaboration among students is the norm. Additionally, collaboration among teachers of different content areas has become a natural part of the day because they are not separated by department. We have an art teacher next to AP psychology and personal finance teachers, for example.

Because today’s learners like and need structure, we work with them at the beginning of each school year to develop expectations for the space; as a result, we have few discipline problems. Teachers no longer hover over students to make sure they are on task. Students appreciate the freedom and understand this freedom is a byproduct of responsible behavior.

Clark Hall has inspired change on our main campus as well. One of the main hubs of most schools and universities is the library. We wanted our library to have the same feel as Clark Hall, so our Librarian, Ann Gleek, dreamt big and made some significant improvements. Changes like removing some of the book shelves, painting the walls, and removing some of the traditional furniture have made for a more social, collaborative and inviting environment for students. There is still a quiet room for study, but the largest part of the space is open and collaborative.

Educational reform must include reforming or transforming the physical learning environment. According to Daniel Pink, design is one of the elements of the right brain that we must tap into. We have to look differently at the space we have now and spruce things up… a lot… for the sake of learning.

I will discuss this in more detail as well as its impact on student learning during my presentation at Ignite 2014!

Be great,
Dwight

Dwight Carter (@Dwight_Carter) is principal of Gahanna Lincoln High School in Ohio. Dwight was named an NASSP Digital Principal in 2013. He will be presenting Digitally Creative Learning Environments on Friday, February 7 at Ignite ’14 in Dallas. For more information and to register visit www.nasspconference.org.

Sources:

  • http://apps.americanbar.org/lpm/lpt/articles/mgt08044.html
  • http://fluency21.com/blog/

Upcoming Webinar: Digital Leadership: Changing Paradigms for Changing Times

Join noted educator, author, and social media leader Eric Sheninger for a free webinar examining digital leadership and how it can bring sustainable change and real transformation to your school.

Digital leadership is a strategic mindset and set of behaviors that leverages resources to create a meaningful, transparent, and engaging school culture. It takes into account recent changes, such as ubiquitous connectivity, open-source technology, mobile devices, and personalization, to dramatically shift how schools have been run and structured for more than a century. In his presentation, Eric will discuss the “Pillars of Digital Leadership,” a new conceptual framework for leaders to begin thinking about changes to professional practice.

This one-hour webinar is intended to start a conversation on digital leadership that attendees can continue during Eric’s “Digital Leadership–Change for Now and the Future” session at the Ignite ’14 conference in Dallas, February 6-8, 2014. For more information on Ignite ’14, visit www.nasspconference.org.