U.S. Department of Education

Advocacy Update: Secretary DeVos Defends the President’s Budget on Capitol Hill

Last week, Secretary Betsy DeVos testified before both the House and Senate Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations Subcommittees to defend the Department of Education’s (ED) funding proposals in the FY 2020 President’s Budget. Both hearings were somewhat contentious, with Democrats pushing DeVos on many of the unpopular cuts to education programs made in the budget and Republicans praising the majority of the proposal. Overall, some policies and highlights emerged from both hearings: (more…)

“We Must Be Advocates”: How the NASSP Advocacy Conference Impacts Education

Education in America is being threatened by reduced funding, teacher shortages, school safety concerns, and more—and it needs your voice now more than ever. The 2019 NASSP Advocacy Conference is your opportunity to gather with peers in the education community and converge on Capitol Hill to meet with policymakers who are making important decisions at the federal level. With the February 11 registration deadline fast approaching, students and learning communities are counting on you to be their advocate.

NASSP spoke with three past conference attendees who shared their experiences as well as why they’ll be attending this year’s event: Steve Baker, principal, Bluffton High School in Bluffton, IN; Erika Burden, principal, Westwood Middle School in Spokane, WA; and Brad Seamer, assistant principal, Harrisburg High School in Harrisburg, SD. (more…)

Midterm Wrap-Up: What Happened, and What to Expect

On Tuesday, November 7, citizens across the nation took to the polls for midterm elections. Much was at stake, and many considered the 2018 midterm election to be a direct review of President Trump’s first two years in office. If that’s the case, there were definitely some mixed results after the dust settled and, in many races, it still continues to do so. This post will examine the results of the election and provide insight into how the results may affect education policy moving forward.

Results (more…)

Bartoletti NPC18 Speech Recommits NASSP to Equity; Admonishes DeVos to Do the Same

In a powerful opening speech at the 2018 NASSP National Principals Conference in July, Executive Director JoAnn Bartoletti once again reinforced NASSP’s commitment to equity and support of public education with a strong statement directed at U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos. (more…)

How Are NASSP’s Priorities Faring During the Appropriations Process?

Earlier this year, congressional leaders in both the House and Senate stated their intent to pass all 12 appropriations bills to avoid another end-of-year budget package—a process often referred to as “regular order,” which hasn’t been done since 1996. In late June, House and Senate Appropriations  subcommittees on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies (Labor-HHS-Ed) both released their spending bills. Below is a quick breakdown of how these bills address some of NASSP’s top priorities, and an update on what their current status is: (more…)

FY 2018 Omnibus a Major Victory for Education Advocates

Last week, the House and Senate passed a $1.3 trillion omnibus bill which will fund the federal government for the remainder of FY 2018. This funding package comes after several short-term funding packages, one government shutdown, and a two-year spending deal. There were major concerns that a funding bill wouldn’t get passed before the March 23 deadline due to several controversial riders, but they were ultimately excluded from the legislation to ensure its passage. (more…)

What Would President Trump’s FY 2019 Budget Request Mean for Education?

On February 12, President Trump released his FY 2019 budget request. While the president’s budget is most likely not going to be enacted by Congress, it is still an important document that allows him to highlight the administration’s spending priorities moving forward. Unfortunately, President Trump’s budget called for drastic reductions in nondefense discretionary programs despite Congress recently passing a deal to raise the budget caps. Trump called for the Department of Education (ED) to receive $63.2 billion in FY 2019. This is a $3.6 billion—or 5.4 percent—cut from the amount ED received in FY 2017.

What follows is an analysis of how some of NASSP’s top priorities faired in Trump’s budget request. (more…)

Advocacy Update: Government Shutdown

After months and months of short-term funding packages, time finally ran out. The Senate was unable to pass a continuing resolution before January 20 and because of this, the federal government has shut down for the first time since 2013.

Much of the impact K–12 education will face will depend on the length of the shutdown. Most education programs are forward funded, meaning dollars are already designated to go out to programs, regardless of a shutdown. However, the longer the shutdown, the greater the impact that will be felt by schools and districts. Overall, we can break down a shutdown’s impact into three main areas for K–12 education: (more…)

Advocacy Update

This Week in National Principals Month

The last full week of National Principals Month (NPM) is loaded with activities and opportunities for school leaders!

October 23 webinar: State Efforts to Elevate Principals

  • Join us for a special webinar hosted by the Council of Chief State School Officers as we examine what the next steps are for states implementing their ESSA plans. The webinar will also offer a unique look into different ways NASSP works to help all principals. You can register for the event here.

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Advocacy Update

This Week in National Principals Month

As October continues, so do the numerous events for National Principals Month (NPM). That is why each remaining Advocacy Update in October will feature a breakdown of the upcoming events of the week so you don’t miss out on these special opportunities:

October 16–20: Shadowing Week (more…)